Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Quick! Giveaway this Thursday!


For those of you not following on Instagram, I thought I’d fill you in on the next giveaway. The winner will be announced this Thursday.


This one’s for a 19th century 3/8” beading plane.

Here’s this contest’s question: 

Why do you believe celebrating historic furniture making by studying and recreating it is important for both woodworkers and the broader culture today?

Rules are the same as before: Write your one sentence entry in the comment field below. There is no wrong answer. The winning one sentence response will be selected based on relevance and cogency. You’ve only got until Thursday morning to make your entry so move quick.

Here’s the mild restoration I’ve done.








So let’s hear it. What do you think? Why is understanding historic furniture making important?

20 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Don't forget to leave your name, reader!

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  3. When we forget the past, we forget the technologies that got us to the present; when we are thus unmoored from earlier days, we are free to cast about until we arrive at a nearby shore and become heroes by rediscovering tools and methods that had been common.

    - Curt S., who doesn't know why my google account shows me as Unknown.

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  4. I aspire to be a better person by studying better people and their works.

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  5. Because it allows us to think about universal problems from different perspectives.

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  6. We are in danger of becoming a culture and a people who have lost a connection with the past that can tie us to the future, and recreating historical pieces strengthens that tie so that we as woodworkers can help society at large retain the tenuous relationship with our ancestors and descendants alike.

    David Taylor
    Learn Relentlessly

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  7. To disabuse ourselves of the belief that great beauty and accomplishment can be found within the coding of social network platforms and not in the ancient, soul-nourishing lone arts.

    Jason King @WedgeandEdge

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  8. It make us realize how efficient and functional wood working can be by using techniques that are proven!!
    David

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  9. Studying historic examples grants us the perspective to critically analyze our own society's technology and culture and place them in a historical context. /Hans

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  10. Historic furniture making reminds us that, while we live in a throw away culture, craft and craftsmen live on and hard work can be beautiful. -- Brett

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  11. If we forget the past, we are doomed to IKEA.

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  12. If we fail to understand our predecessor's methods of work, as well as the associated pitfalls, we handicap our current and future work by dooming ourselves to make the same mistakes as our forebears; in addition, this lack of understanding prevents us from building on established knowledge, as Issac Newton so aptly put it, "seeing farther... By standing on the shoulders of giants."

    Nathan Spaulding

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  13. We learn from our past in this way we strive to inprove our knowledge of our craft.

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  14. There was a time in human history when there was no concept of throw-away anything, therefore, our craft is the highest form of what is relevant to society today - conserving and building things that last is the highest form of preserving our natural resources.

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  15. To paraphrase Paul Bunyan:

    "...tidings of another: doth shew, him how to mount to that from this below."

    Vernon Doucette

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    1. That should be "To paraphrase John Bunyan:"

      Obviously I'm a pilgrim that needs progressing. Sigh...

      Vernon Doucette

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  16. God's word says it all. “and to make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.”
    ‭‭1 Thessalonians‬ ‭4:11-12‬ ‭NIV‬‬

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  17. It is a wonderful thing to discover that while the lives of our ancestors were different, their minds and hearts were much the same - and to work this way is to commune with them, though they are gone.

    - Chris Hammerbach, formerly of Bath

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