Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Carved Slat Replacement Complete


Got it done today.


Marking the shoulders way too fat to be on the safe side

Laying out tenons (again with extra for paring later)

Began cutting shoulder and tenon cheek

Cleaning out mortise of severed tenon fragments

Check to see shoulder to shoulder distance

Little by little cut shoulder line back

Almost close enough to make it fit (still a little long) but the angle is wrong

Corrected angle and length between shoulders

Hey, it fits now!

Pulled it back out and proceeded with pigments, dyes, and shellac, rottenstone, wax, etc.

It's the top one (below the crest rail)

Detail shot

Detail Shot

Detail to compare original stile versus new slat

Detail shot

View from behind to compare sheen

7 comments:

  1. Is it possible for you to give me a detailed finish sequence that you used on the chair back slat.So I could learn the procedure to create the type finish that you reproduced.Bob Lindh,Western Pa.....lindhrr@comcast.net

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    1. It's never exactly a measured recipe or anything. This is more artistic than calculated. It usually involves Transtint dyes as a base color, sometimes pigmented oil stain on top of the that, then pigmented shellac, then maroon scotch brite with alcohol to wipe some off, then more pigmented shellac, etc. I let it dry a little and press it with my fingers to dull the sheen, use paper towels to do the same,pour rottonstone on it and rub it into cracks, pigmented paste wax with steel wool vigorously, wipe off and buff with towel. Someday perhaps I'll do a video of a similar treatment.

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  2. How did you get the slat tenons into their mortises with the crest rail and back still together?

    Thanks

    Doug

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    Replies
    1. Good question. I forgot to explain that the crest rail had a split (proper left side - i.e. right side of picture) so the stiles could be spread apart some. The two other slats were also loose. I was able to spread enough to get 5/8" tenons in there.

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    2. Thank you, nicely done,

      Doug

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  3. I apologize if you've you already explained the work sequence, but why did you not cut and fit the tenons prior to doing the detailed carving?

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    Replies
    1. Potomacker,

      Good question. I don't know. I wasn't too concerned about overcutting the shoulder distance so I wasn't worried about ruining the piece. As long as it wouldn't be ruined, I don't think it really matters which comes first.

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